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Saturday, September 1, 2012

BABY TORTOISE

BABY TORTOISE,
BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES

BABY TORTOISES



  1. Tortoises are in the order Testudines and a family of land-dwelling reptiles . Like their marine cousins, the sea turtles, tortoises are shielded from predators by a shell
  2. tortoises (some individuals) are known to have lived longer than 150 years
  3. tortoises (most of them) are sexually dimorphic, though the differences between males and females vary from species to species.
  4. tortoise males have a longer, more protruding neck plate than their female counterparts, while in others the claws are longer on the females. 
  5. tortoise In most species, the female tends to be larger than the male. The male also has a plastron that is curved inwards to aid reproduction. The easiest way to determine the $ex of a tortoise is to look at the tail. The females, as a general rule have a smaller tail which is dropped down whereas the males have a much longer tail which is usually pulled up and to the side of the rear shell.
  6. tortoise Females dig nesting burrows in which they lay from one to thirty eggs. Egg laying typically occurs at night, after which the mother tortoise covers her clutch with sand, soil, and organic material. The eggs are left unattended, and depending on the species, take from 60 to 120 days to incubate. The size of the egg depends on the size of the mother and can be estimated by examining the width of the cloacal opening between the carapace and plastron. 
  7. Tortoise female`s plastron of a often has a noticeable V-shaped notch below the tail which facilitates passing the eggs. Upon completion of the incubation period, a fully formed hatchling uses an egg tooth to break out of its shell. It digs to the surface of the nest and begins a life of survival on its own. Hatchlings are born with an embryonic egg sac which serves as a source of nutrition for the first 3 to 7 days until they have the strength and mobility to find food. Juvenile tortoises often require a different balance of nutrients than adults, and therefore may eat foods which a more mature tortoise would not. For example, it is common that the young of a strictly herbivorous species will consume worms or insect larvae for additional protein.

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise

baby Radiated Tortoise
baby Radiated Tortoise,

baby Red-footed Tortoise

baby Red-footed Tortoise

baby Red-footed Tortoise

baby Red-footed Tortoise

baby Red-footed Tortoise
baby Red-footed Tortoise

baby Pancake Tortoise

baby Pancake Tortoise

baby Pancake Tortoise

baby Pancake Tortoise

baby Pancake Tortoise

baby Pancake Tortoise
baby Pancake Tortoise

baby sulcata tortoise

baby sulcata tortoise

baby sulcata tortoise

baby sulcata tortoise

baby sulcata tortoise

baby sulcata tortoise
baby sulcata tortoise

baby Russian Tortoise

baby Russian Tortoise

baby Russian Tortoise

baby Russian Tortoise

baby Russian Tortoise

baby Russian Tortoise
baby Russian Tortoise

baby Yellow-footed Tortoise







baby Yellow-footed Tortoise